All Courses

  • [SS] Psychology: Extended Campus (IU8)

    In this course, you will learn about psychology, beginning with a brief history of psychologists and their experimental methods. You then examine psychological concepts, such as personality theories, human development, and consciousness, including sleep, dreams, and psychoactive substances. You’ll also investigate social psychology and psychological disorders, demonstrating your understanding by completing projects in which you play roles like teacher, parent, and psychologist.

  • [HPE] Health: Extended Campus (IU8)

    In this course, you will investigate components of mental, emotional, social, consumer, physical and reproductive health.

  • [MA] Algebra 2: Extended Campus (FLVS)

    In this course, mathematical concepts are applied to everyday occurrences such as earthquakes, stadium seating, and purchasing movie tickets. Learners investigate the effects of an equation on its graph through the use of technology.

  • [MA] Algebra 1: Extended Campus (FLVS)

    In this course, learners acquire the basic knowledge and skills needed for all future high school math courses.

  • [HPE] Fitness for Life: Extended Campus (IU8)

    In this course, learners understand that physical fitness and nutrition are important parts of everyday life.

  • [MA] Pre-Algebra: Extended Campus (IU8)

    In this course, you will continue to study integers, the order of operations, variables, expressions, equations, and polynomials.

  • [SC] Environmental Science: Extended Campus (IU8)

    In this course will focus on both biotic and abiotic systems. You will learn about ecosystems and their interactions, water (including surface water, ponds and lakes, ground water, water quality), soils, and resources both renewable and non-renewable resources.

  • [SS] Economics: Extended Campus (FLVS)

    In this course, learners will build an understanding of how economic decisions affect us every day of our lives. Understanding economics means thinking about how scarcity, or limited resources, requires us to make choices and evaluate one option against others. In this course, learners will recognize examples of economics in their daily life.

  • [MA] Pre-Calculus: Extended Campus (IU8)

    In this course, learners build an understanding of concepts ranging from polynomial, rational, and exponential functions to conic sections. They work with trigonometry concepts such as Law of Sines and Cosines will be introduced.

  • [SS] Civics: Extended Campus (IU8)

    In this course, learners will be introduced to the major ideas, institutions, and issues in American government and politics. The focus is on how the structure of our political system influences the practice of politics at the national level. They will also build an understanding of the ongoing struggles among competing groups and individuals for influence over government activities and public policy.

  • [ELA] Language Arts 6A (SM)

    In this course, you will read and analyze informational texts. These texts take many different forms, including biographies, personal accounts of events, instructional documents, film reviews, and persuasive letters. The course's reading selections demonstrate ways to understand explicit and implicit information, central ideas and key details, and claims and arguments, among other ideas and concepts. You will read the novel The Road by Jack London. They will also examine informational texts to better their understanding of the science behind sunsets, the lives of several important historical figures, the history of the Olympics, and the process of flotation used by archeologists, among other topics.

  • [ELA] Language Arts 6B (SM)

    In this course, you will focus on learning reading skills based on literary texts. The texts come from a number of genres and include a novel, excerpts from novels, short stories, poems, and plays. The course’s reading selections demonstrate ways to understand explicit and implicit information, theme, characters, plot, poetic techniques, and figurative language, among other ideas and concepts. You will read the entire novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in almost every lesson throughout the course. You will read excerpts from the novels Little Women and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, and stories and plays about challenging situations, getting caught doing something wrong, finding something unexpected, and why the crocodile has a wide mouth. Additionally, you will read poems from famous poets, such as Robert Louis Stevenson, Robert Frost, and Carl Sandburg, to name a few. You will also watch several videos of famous poems being read aloud. As you read the novels, short stories, poems, and plays in this course, you will practice ways to identify central ideas and themes; make inferences; analyze word choice; identify figurative and connotative language; and compare and contrast poems, poems to stories, poems to video versions. In addition, you will learn about basics in grammar, usage, and punctuation, including conjunctive adverbs, predicate adjectives, various types of pronouns, active and passive voice, and semicolons and colons. You will also learn 20 new vocabulary words in each of the first five units of the course. In addition, you will learn the elements of narrative writing so that you can plan, create, write, revise, and edit your own personal narrative. You will also learn about different forms of poetry and their characteristics, and different poetic techniques in order to write several types of poems. Through the lessons provided in this course, you will master techniques that help you achieve a deeper appreciation of literary texts and narrative and poetry writing.

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